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Subject: Queen Mary Bell Boys Chapter 158 Queen Mary Bell-boys by badboi666 =============================================================================== If sex with boys isn’t your thing, go away. If, as is much more likely, you’ve come to this site precisely to get your rocks off reading about sex with 14-year-olds then make yourself comfortable – you’re in the right place. Don’t leave, however, without doing this: Donate to Nifty – these buggers may do it for love but they still have to eat. fty/donate.html =============================================================================== Chapter 158 The four of us flew to New York where I hired a car for a few days at JFK. The drive to Kingston took longer than I’d anticipated because of the awful traffic thanks to a big hold up on the Tappan Zee, and it was after dark before we reached Kingston. We got two rooms for three nights at the Best Western without difficulty – it was the dead time for American tourists between Thanksgiving and Christmas. I had a look through the local phone book after dinner, and was pleased to find no fewer than four separate entries for Fishbein. With luck that would be the parents and the three sons. I noted down the addresses and Charlie and I decided to visit Fishbein J. first, not least because it was he whom we’d seen after the War. It was 23 years since Chip’s death – what was Jakey doing now? “Are you sure this is a good idea?” said Charlie, “remember what happened in Liverpool.” “It’s not the same at all. Jews don’t become priests.” George and Kevin had no idea what we were talking about, so another lengthy explanation was needed. Kevin was fascinated. “There’s so much about you two I don’t know. I didn’t know your priest was up to no good with you.” “That’s how we got started, Kevin. James is our priest’s brother.” The sound of scales falling from eyes was discernible. “And he recruited you as … whores?” “Don’t be scared of the word, Kevin, it’s the one Patrick always uses,” said Charlie quietly. “And you were another one, George?” “Yup. Patrick seduced me. A bit like the two of them seduced you, come to think of it.” Kevin snuggled closer to George. “Yes,” he whispered happily, “and look where it’s got me.” The next morning we set off for Fishbein J, arriving just after nine. There was no reply to the bell, but a woman came out of the house next door. “You looking for Jakey? He’s in the store, just a couple blocks over.” The store turned out to be Fishbein Brothers, and whatever it had been in the 1930s and 1940s it hadn’t been that. Neither Charlie nor I could remember – our time spent in Kingston hadn’t been devoted to the town’s economic well-being. Fishbein Brothers seemed, from a cursory glance at the store front, to sell pretty well anything the good folk of Kingston might need in the way of food and drink. We went in. Aisles of food and drink stretched in front of us. We weren’t accustomed to supermarkets in 1967, so it was something of a culture shock. “There aren’t any counters,” said Kevin. More to the point there weren’t any people either – store-keepers, that is. Le tout Kingston was there though, busily augmenting the profits of Fishbein Brothers. After a few aisles Charlie spied someone with a name badge proclaiming that he was Irving. “Irving,” said Charlie, all bold, “is Mr Fishbein around. I need to have a word with him.” “Oh sure, but which one? Mr Jakey’s in back but Mr Cyrus is in New York today.” Charlie said that it was Mr Jakey he wanted to see. “Stay right there,” said the helpful Irving, “and I’ll call him for you.” “Is Irving important with a capital-I, do you think?” I said to Charlie. Irving had all the attributes of being in that select category: slim, 20-ish, nice smile, and when he turned to fetch Jakey, a nice arse. “Stop it,” hissed Charlie. “The good news, surely,” said George, “is that at least two of them are still in Kingston. If Cyrus is only in New York for the day there could be quite a party later.” “Esau wasn’t mentioned though,” said Charlie. A dark figure emerged with Irving in tow. The dark figure stopped short. He told Irving it was fine, and that he could go. The dark figure broke into a grin. “If that’s Charlie then you’re Patrick.” Hugs were exchanged. I introduced George and Kevin. Jakey’s eyebrows rose, eloquently asking an unspoken question. “Tell you later,” I said. “Come through to the office and I’ll rustle up some coffee. ataköy escort Kevin, no doubt in the company you’re keeping you do all kinds of grown-up things, so I take it a coffee or a beer would be agreeable. Have I got the British idiom right, Patrick?” I grinned. “Oh yes, Jakey, that you have. Coffee would be most agreeable, but it’s a bit early for a beer.” Coffee, brought in by Irving, was set before us and Irving left us with a smile. This time it was my eyebrows doing the asking. Jakey nodded. “Not mine though. Cy’s in the Big Apple today arguing about a missed delivery. He’ll be back later. Why don’t the four of you come round for dinner? If we chew the fat now we’ll have to chew it all over again later. So let’s just drink our coffee and we’ll cover the basics. OK?” It was OK. Charlie told him about the restaurant and where Kevin fitted in. Kevin blushed furiously at some of his host’s pointed questioning. “Can I ask you something, Jakey,” he said when Jakey’s curiosity has been satisfied. “Go ahead, Kevin.” “Who fucks Irving?” “You asked for that, Jakey,” I said. “OK,” said Jakey, “I’ll tell you what the Fishbein tribe have been up to. Rueben died ten years ago but Sarah’s still very much alive. Cy and E and I bought this place with the money Rueben left us – the cunning old bastard had a vast amount squirreled away that none of us knew about. The two stores were run down, so we remodelled and knocked them into one, and now we have the Kingston business wrapped up apart from a mom-and-pop down the street. But you’re more interested in other things, I guess.” He explained that Cy and Abe were together still. Abe was a partner in a local law firm, and Fishbein Brothers was one of their larger clients. “Bigger still if Cy has to sue those bastards in New York. Irving’s Esau’s current squeeze. He likes ’em young and he’s hopeless at anything long-term.” I said I was astonished that Esau could get away with such a life style in a small town. “You aint the only one, Patrick, but get away he always has done. Mind you, he has an excuse. You remember when we met in 1945 on Queen Mary I said that Esau was all right. Well, he was then. The poor sod came all through the War without a scratch and then went and lost a leg in a stupid motor bike accident before he left Germany. They made a mess of sorting him out and by the time he got to a decent American military hospital it had to be amputated and he lost the other foot as well. My poor old twin has been in and out of places ever since. He’s been fine mentally for years now, but he’s never far from the edge. You’ll understand how important the right kind of care and affection are for him – he hasn’t really changed all that much since we all first got to know each other in 1936 – God! that’s 31 years ago.” It couldn’t be left there, and Charlie (who’s more sensitive than I am) asked gently what Esau was doing. “Oh, he’s a big part of Fishbein Brothers all right. Not in the store, but he handles the contracts side – ordering stock and so on. He may only have less than a full set of legs, but he’s got a first-class business brain and he’s a mean bastard when it comes to hassling a supplier. He’d be in New York instead of Cy, but he’s busy with Abe sorting out a legal problem.” At this point Irving knocked and put his head round the door. “Can I get you fresh coffee?” Jakey beckoned him in. “Shut the door, Irving, and pull up a seat. These two gentlemen met Esau and me in 1936. They run a restaurant in England, and this boy – Kevin – does the kinds of things for them that you do for Esau.” Kevin’s blushes were now off the scale. Irving’s weren’t far behind. “Don’t worry, boys, we’re all in the same boat, trust me. Irving, I want you to go over and tell Esau and Abe that Patrick and Charlie are here with two friends. They, and you, are to come to my place at 6 tonight for a meal and a long, long evening. Got that? I’ll tell Cy myself. No excuses, mind. This is … a Royal Command. (Have I got that, Patrick?)” Irving grinned. “I shall do your bidding, master.” “Fuck off then, there’s a good boy.” When Irving had gone Jakey completed the litany of the basics. “He does everything for E. I reckon this one’ll last – I certainly hope so. E’s not getting any younger and Irving really loves him. I’ve told you about Cy and Abe. Who else?” “Come off it Jakey, you know perfectly well who merter escort else. What about you?” “Guess.” Charlie and I looked at each other. I said, “if you’re telling us to guess then you must assume that we have enough information to make a guess, and the only three possibilities are that you’re on your own, which seems unlikely – a fine lusty fellow like you – or that you’ve seen the error of your depraved youth and decided to make some poor woman a good husband … or it’s Harry.” Jakey grinned. “You always were a clever bastard, Patrick. You’re right, of course, it’s Harry. He’s not a Fishbein, but he’s a part of Fishbein Brothers.” We sat quietly: there was so much more to ask. I couldn’t stop myself. “Did you ever go to see Chip’s parents?” “I wondered if you’d ask that. Yes, I did, only a couple weeks after I got home. I drove out to Iowa – it took four days – and visited with them. Chip had no brothers or sisters, so his Mom and Pop were all alone. I didn’t let them know I was coming – I couldn’t work up the courage to make a phone call – so when this stranger turned up on their doorstep saying he was Chip’s buddy they couldn’t wait to hear everything about him – how he died, where he died, did he have a grave they could visit – it was awful. His Mom started to cry and that set me off. They didn’t ask if Chip and I were … you know … but I don’t think they needed to. After the two of us had stopped weeping his Mom said ‘I hope Chip didn’t suffer’, and I told them again that he wouldn’t have known a thing about it. ‘We loved him so much’, she said and I found myself nodding. His Pop put his hand on my shoulder. ‘Thank you, son’, he said, ‘thank you for loving our boy’. And I fucking started to weep again. Thank God I didn’t have the Jew nightmare while I was there – I stayed three days.” “Did the nightmares fade?” asked Charlie. “Yes, but not for years. Uncle Sam paid for me to see a shrink in Albany, and that might have helped, I suppose. I haven’t had one for – oh, it must be 15 years now.” “When did Harry become an item?” “Pretty well as soon as I got back. We had a riotous Thanksgiving in 1945 – E was still in hospital in Germany, but the rest of the fag Jews were all here. Harry just sort of moved in – it wasn’t planned – and when we were lying in bed after I told him about Chip. Like you buggers he was very tender and loving and … well, I knew I had a big hole in my life that suddenly didn’t feel as empty. I still missed Chip, but Harry said that Chip probably didn’t mind too much, and that life was for living. Some shit like that – I can’t remember exactly – and then he fucked me again and he’s been fucking me ever since. Well, that’s when I’m not fucking him.” George and Kevin had sat through all this, neither of them saying a word. Irving put his head round the door to say that he’d seen Esau and Abe and that excitement was running high in those parts. “Go and see Ma,” said Jakey, “she’ll have a fit. I’m off home to see Harry to arrange for a big meal tonight. See you at 6,” and we were off the premises in no time. Jakey must have phoned Sarah because when we showed up 20 minutes later she was expecting us. Oh my!” she said, “I don’t know what to make of it – so long has passed and you’re all so grown up. Silly of me, I know, the boys are always ribbing me about saying things like that. Come in, come in.” I introduced George and Kevin and Sarah gave us all a big Jewish momma hug. “Is it really 26 years?” Coffee and cakes make an appearance and we settled down to exchange news. I told her that we’d been to the store – “haven’t they done a wonderful job! It was really run down before” – and that we were summoned to Jakey’s for a meal and a good gossip. “Oh my! I haven’t heard that word in I don’t know how many years! You’ll be there all night, there’s so much to tell,” and her hand flew to her mouth in embarrassment, but none of us showed any sign that she’d said anything unfortunate. Charlie told her all about the restaurant and she quizzed him closely about various aspects of what went on in his domain. “And Kevin is your assistant?” Kevin smiled. “I’ve been with them for two years now, and I learn something new every day.” Sarah looked at George. “We’ve not met, have we?” George explained that he had been a bell boy before the War, but that he and his partner had volunteered for navy service, and so missed out bahçeşehir escort on serving with Queen Mary. “My boys volunteered too, and all three of them came through OK. Did Jakey tell you about poor Esau? He needs care to do the everyday things – it must be so embarrassing – but he has a sweet boy to look after him.” She looked sideways at Charlie and me. “I remember what you said about … you know … Cy and Abe and the twins when you were here in ’42, and I’m not so old that I’m blind. I think Esau has a soft spot for Irving, and I’m damn sure Irving has a soft spot for Esau. But Esau’s so prickly and independent – I don’t know,” and a tear rolled down her cheek. I put an arm round her. “Sarah, you’re a wise woman, you know what’s what. If it’s what’s meant to be, then it’ll happen.” (Afterwards Charlie said that that was one of the silliest things he’d ever heard me say.) “So why are you here? Are you staying long?” George explained about Queen Mary’s final voyage and how we’d decided to fly home via Kingston. “Just to see my boys?” I nodded. “You’re real sweet, all of you.” ***** When we got to Jakey’s at just after 6 Harry flung open the door and wrapped Charlie and me in a huge hug. I introduced George and Kevin, although in a more detailed way than I had thought it necessary to do at Sarah’s. “You brought your boy with you, George? I like your style,” said Harry, hugging George and the brought boy (to the latter’s near suffocation). “Come on in and meet the gang. Patrick – you do the introductions while I go and do important stuff behind the scenes.” “He makes a mean martini,” said Jakey, “and that’s where he’s gone.” Esau was in a high-backed chair looking older than Jakey. “Hi, guys,” he said, “I expect you know I can’t get up. Come and tell me things.” Irving moved over to make a space. The door bell rang and Cy and Abe walked in, both looking pleased to see old friends. Harry and the martinis completed the party. Kevin asked if he could have a beer and one was brought. “Now that we all have a drink,” said Jakey, “I want to propose a toast.” “Oh God, Jakey, can’t we just get one down us first?” said Esau. I patted his arm and he smiled. “I remember you were always good at calming things, Patrick,” he whispered. Jakey’s toast was ‘to transatlantic friendships’, which seemed short and sweet, so Esau got his martini where it would do the most good pretty quickly. His glass was refilled: nobody else’s needed it – yet. There’s no need for me to report all that was said that evening. The martinis gave way to a very nice Californian white (and later, red) accompanying a splendid meal. Charlie was intrigued, as was Kevin. When the meal was over both of them made a point of helping Harry to carry plates through to the kitchen, managing to stem offers of help from George and me. I heard what happened then when we were in bed. Harry had been drafted to an USAF base, and fetched up in Oklahoma. Possibly because he had told the recruiting people that he’d worked in the soda fountain (who knew how Uncle Sam made his dispositions?) Harry had been sent to work in the kitchens. By the end of the War he must have learned something, because he had a proper qualification when he was demobbed. Back in Kingston it took him two days to hook up with Jakey, and one Thanksgiving holiday to work out that he and Jakey were meant to be an item. They hadn’t lived together at first, but when Rueben died and they bought the store he and Jakey had bought a house together. He was a sleeping partner in the business. He was also a bloody good cook. The meal that evening for nine people, decided upon in the late morning, had been rustled up from scratch. “Kevin asked so many questions, every one of them intelligent. I was so proud of him.” I cuddled him. “You’re a good teacher, Charlie MacKenzie.” “You’re no slouch either, Mulloy.” “We’re going to need all our skills tomorrow then,” I whispered. At my insistence we were expected at Esau’s for 1000. “I’m fit to see folk by then,” he had said. =============================================================================== The fun continues in Chapter 159 as I go into battle for Irving. The story is, of course, fiction, but the photographs in Queen Mary 2 are real, as are the details of the final voyage. I first saw the boys while making a transatlantic crossing in 2017, and had the pleasure of seeing them again in April 2019, smiling at the knowledge of all the things that had befallen them since I first saw them, and thought again how cute “I” was. I’m sure he had adventures in real life … Drop me a line at net – that is after you’ve dropped a few quid. =============================================================================

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